NEW EXAM PATIENTS

Indirect ophthalmoscopy

Tonometry 

Schirmer Tear Testing

Fluorescin Staining

Rose Bengal Staining

 

Elizabethan Collar

Large Animal Clinic

Slit Lamp Biomicroscopy

Indirect Ophthalmoscopy

Slit lamp biomicroscopy

Small Animal Patients

 

For small animal patients, please have your pet on a leash or in a carrier prior to entering the Eye Clinic.

 

Check in with the receptionist when you arrive at the Eye Clinic. You will be given forms to fill out, after which the receptionist will create a medical record for your pet.

 

You will be escorted to a scale and your pet will be weighed. The assistant will ask about your pets eye problem. Please have all of
your pets medications with you to show the assistant.

 

The ophthalmologist will examine your pet with an assistant or veterinary technician to assist in holding your pet. This exam is performed in a darkened, quiet room, with the pets owner present.

 

The eye examination is performed with high magnification slit lamp biomicroscopy to assess the eyelids, cornea, aqueous, iris, and lens.

 

Indirect ophthalmoscopy is performed to assess the vitreous, retina, and optic disc.

 

Tonometry to assess intraocular pressure, is highly recommended for the majority of patients. Intraocular pressure can change daily, and can provide significant information about your pets eye disease.

 

Other Examination Tests may be recommended by the doctor depending upon the initial findings with the slit lamp.  These tests include the Schirmer Tear Test, Fluorescein Staining, or Rose Bengal Staining. These tests are not performed in every eye or every patient.

 

Schirmer Tear Testing is performed by inserting a standardized test strip paper across the lower eyelid and is folded into the space between the cornea and the eyelid. This test can determine the ability of your pet to make tears.

 

Fluorescein Staining is performed to assess for microbreaks, scratches (erosions), or pits (ulcers) in the cornea surface.

 

Rose Bengal Staining is performed to assess irritation of the cornea.

It can be useful for more subtle detection than that evidenced by fluorescein staining.

 

Exam Findings

The doctor will take a few moments to input the results of the eye examination into your pets medical record. The doctor discusses with you the eye examination findings. Depending upon the eye problem, additional testing (see services) may or may not be recommended. Options for treatment are discussed. You the client, decide which treatment option works best for you and your pet.

 

Discharge Summary

You are provided with a discharge summary that has the diagnosis,

medication recommendations, and explanation of your pets eye problem. You leave the Eye Clinic with this summary, and medications and/or an Elizabethan collar (cone) may be dispensed, depending upon the diagnosis.

 

A Referral Letter is sent to your family veterinarian just after you leave the Eye Clinic.

 

Second Opinions

The Eye Clinic both provides second ophthalmologist’ opinions, and understands if a second ophthalmologist’s opinion is desired after your visit to the Eye Clinic.

 

Elizabethan Collar (Cone)

If the ophthalmologist prescribes an Elizabethan collar, it is highly recommended to use the E. collar full time, 24 hours a day.  The collar is custom fitted at the Eye Clinic for best eye support. Do not have your pet groomed if an E. collar has been prescribed.

 

 

Large Animal Patients

 

For large animal patients please check in with the assistant before unloading. The assistant will be present 15 minute prior to your appointment. Eye Clinic for Animals staff are not permitted to assist with unloading or loading your animal.

 

Unload your large animal and take to the examination stall, as directed by the assistant.

 

You will be given forms to fill out for the medical record. Have all of your medications present to show the assistant.

 

The ophthalmologist will examine your animal in a darkened quiet stall, with the owner present.

 

Depending upon temperament, horses and mules may require sedation administered intravenously in order to examine their eyes safely.

 

If an eye of a horse or mule cannot be opened for evaluation, an eyelid block may be administered by the doctor.

 

The eye examination is performed with high magnification slit lamp biomicroscopy to assess the eyelids, cornea, aqueous, iris, and lens.

 

Indirect ophthalmoscopy is performed to assess the vitreous, retina, and optic disc.

 

Tonometry to assess intraocular pressure is highly recommended. Intraocular pressure can change daily, and can provide significant information about your animals eye disease.

 

Other Examination Tests may be recommended depending upon the initial findings with the slit lamp.

 

Fluorescein Staining may be performed to assess for corneal microbreaks, corneal erosions or corneal ulcers.

 

Exam Findings

The ophthalmologist will discuss the examination findings with you.

Depending upon the eye problem additional testing (see services) may or may not be recommended. Options for treatment are discussed, and a treatment plan is devised that best suits your animal and your needs.

Medications may or may not be dispensed. You receive a written discharge summary.

 

A Referral Letter is sent to your general veterinarian within a 24 hour period of your appointment, and a copy is sent to your home. 

 

 

Tonometry

Barn Interior

©2015 Eye Clinic for Animals  |  Contact Us